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Terry Anderson at the Beeb

August 29, 2015 in General

BBC Radio Scotland hosted a talk about the future of cartooning, precipitated by Steve Bell’s appearance at the Edinburgh Book Festival. The programme is here and Terry’s eloquent contribution is at the 01:51:30 mark.

Also keep your eyes (and ears) open for further Blog updates on the “Drawn Out” series of podcasts that Terry has spent the last few weeks recording. These entail conversations with cartoonists, animators, illustrators etc., from around Scotland.
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by Jonesy

Ronald Searle exhibition in his hometown

August 26, 2015 in General

From the Ronald Searle Blog:

Ronald Searle (1920-2011) is among Britain’s most popular and celebrated graphic satirists.

Born in Cambridge, Searle is best known as the inventor of the fictional girls’ school St. Trinian’s (1948) and for his collaborations on Geoffrey Willans’ Molesworth series (1953- 58). However, as this exhibition shows, he had a long and productive career across a range of different genres. Searle worked as a war artist, but also made drawings for book and magazine illustration, travel reportage, theatre, film, medals and political caricature. Fuelled by visits to the Fitzwilliam Museum during his formative years, he had keen sense of his own place in the history of caricature – a selection of work by the caricaturists he most admired will be on display in a complementary exhibition in the Charrington Print Room (16).
This exhibition is drawn from a recent gift of the artist’s work, generously presented to the Museum by his children in 2014.
An associated exhibition Coming Home: Ronald Searle and Cambridge School of Art, curated by Professor Martin Salisbury, will run concurrently at Anglia Ruskin University’s Ruskin Galleryfrom 13 October – 19 November.
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The Guardian picks up on LA Times’ dismissal of political cartoonist Ted Rall

August 26, 2015 in General

Award-winning cartoonist and journalist Ted Rall has accused the Los Angeles Times of wrongly casting doubt on his professional integrity, retracting one of his columns and ending his freelance work with the paper in order to curry favor with the Los Angeles police department.

The Association of American Editorial Cartoonists has called for an investigation into the process resulting in the Rall’s dismissal, saying the Times “should have demanded a higher standard of proof in this matter”.

A frequent critic of the LAPD and winner of multiple national awards, Rall was formerly a staple of the Los Angeles Times opinion pages. The controversy centers on a column he wrote in May about jaywalking fines, which began with Rall’s recollection of a 2001 incident during which the cartoonist claimed he was handcuffed and “roughed up” by an LAPD officer, who threw his driver’s license into the sewer, during a jaywalking stop. Rall also says he was not jaywalking at the time.

The LAPD contacted the Times to dispute the account, providing difficult-to-hear audio recorded by the officer who conducted the stop, the text of Rall’s complaint in 2002, which mentions the discarded license but not the handcuffs, and the officer’s written denial.601

Cartoon News Round Up

August 19, 2015 in General

Charlie Hebdo: the global view

Charlie Hebdo: The Global View

Index on Censorship has just compiled a valuable international overview of the assault on free speech — with the Hebdo killings serving as its hub.  Editor Rachael Jolley has brought together insightful, far-flung contributors like novelist Elif Shafak, journalist Hannah Leung, and Father Ted creator Arthur Matthews to examine the echoes, repercussions and contradictions of the Hebdo tragedy in Charlie Hebdo: A Global View.

 

Video: Zapiro talks about his cartoons in South Africa (click to view)

 

The Ted Rall controversy

The LA Times’ former editorial cartoonist claims the LAPD forced his dismissal from the paper. This is the cartoonist’s take on the matter:

…and here’s the AAEC’s:

 

Plagiarism (again)

When pulled up by political cartoonist Graeme Mackay, the plagiarist comes across as a particularly bright and charming specimen…

http://dailycartoonist.com/index.php/2015/08/14/graeme-mackay-exposes-twitter-account-altering-cartoons-for-political-purposes/

“Prof Tucker’s” response to Graeme MacKay’s Blog account of the affair is, um, interesting too:

http://mackaycartoons.net/2015/08/12/harpersgotagosgotago/
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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by Royston

Shooting Cartoonists at the Seaside

August 17, 2015 in Events, General, News

Shooting Cartoonists at the Seaside (Herne Bay) © David Cross

Shooting Cartoonists at the Seaside (Herne Bay), a watercolour © David Cross. Click image to enlarge

We’re grateful to David Cross for sending us this wonderful watercolour of cartoonists in action at the Herne Bay Cartoon Festival. Click the image to enlarge and see how many cartoonists, and other great details, you can spot.

David, who curated the Outrage! exhibition at the Seaside Gallery, called the painting Shooting Cartoonists at the Seaside (Herne Bay).

He explains: “I was around all day, mainly taking photos and noticing all the other heavy-camera guys snapping away like crazy. I sat at the drawing board the next day and put it together from photos and memory and some invention.”

The photographer pictured at the front is George Wilson, a recorder of Herne Bay’s social and cultural life since the 1960s.

Fun in the sunshine at Herne Bay

August 10, 2015 in Events, General, News

Board by Rob Murray. Photo © Gerard Whyman

Board by Rob Murray. Photo © Gerard Whyman

The sun shone on the Herne Bay Cartoon Festival yet again this year. Here’s a selection of photos of the live-drawing day, 2 August, by Kasia Kowalski and Gerard Wyman.

Photo © Kasia Kowalska

Cartoonists at ease, at easels. Click image to enlarge. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

Surreal McCoy and Cathy Simpson with the essential tools of the trade: pens. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

Surreal McCoy and Cathy Simpson with the essential tools of the trade: pens. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

Jeremy Banx at work. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

Jeremy Banx at work. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

... and his finished board. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

… and his finished board. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

Several flags by Banx, all with different seaside designs, were flown from the turrets of the Bandstand. Pic © Jeremy Banx

Several flags by Jeremy Banx, all with different seaside designs, were flown from the turrets of the Bandstand. Pic © Jeremy Banx

Here's another of the flags from a few days earlier, the festival launch, with Royston Robertson, Nathan Ariss and Be a Francis, 8. Photo © Brian Green for the Herne Bay Times

Here’s another of the flags from a few days earlier, the festival launch, with Royston Robertson, Nathan Ariss and Bea Francis, 6. Photo © Brian Green for the Herne Bay Times

Simon Ellinas draws caricatures. Photo © Gerard Whyman

Simon Ellinas draws caricatures. Alex Hughes also tirelessly drew festival-goers throughout the day. Photo © Gerard Whyman

The weather allowed cartoonists to display a range of silly hats. Left to right: Ger Wyman, Royston Robertson, Matt Buck. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

The weather allowed cartoonists to display a range of silly hats. Left to right: Gerard Wyman, Royston Robertson, Matt Buck. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

Tim Harries hosted a cartoon workshop. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

Tim Harries hosted a cartoon workshop. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

The illustrated man: Glen Marshall's board was more performance art than cartoon. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

The illustrated man: Glen Marshall’s board was more performance art than cartoon. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

Bill Stott's board tackled a favourite current obsession of the media: seagulls. Perfect for Herne Bay! Photo © Gerard Whyman

Bill Stott’s board tackled a favourite current obsession of the media: seagulls. Click to enlarge and read. Perfect for Herne Bay! Photo © Gerard Whyman

More seagulls by Royston Robertson. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

More seagulls by Royston Robertson. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

Cartoonist Rob Murray does like to be beside the seaside. Photo © Gerard Whyman

Cartoonist Rob Murray does like to be beside the seaside. Photo © Gerard Whyman

One of the communal boards, with cartoons by Ger Wyman, Matt "Hack" Buck, Royston Robertson, Des Buckley, Tim Sanders and Nathan Ariss. Photo © Gerard Wyman

One of the communal boards, with cartoons by Ger Wyman, Matt “Hack” Buck, Royston Robertson, Des Buckley, Tim Sanders, Steve Way and Nathan Ariss. Click image to enlarge and read. Photo © Gerard Wyman

Herne Bay Cartoon Festival wouldn't be complete without a great seaside cartoon by The Independent's Dave Brown. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

Herne Bay Cartoon Festival wouldn’t be complete without a great seaside cartoon by The Independent’s Dave Brown. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

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Herne Bay: the exhibitions

August 9, 2015 in Events, General, News

Private view of the Lines in the Sand exhibition. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

Private view of the Lines in the Sand exhibition. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

Three exhibitions were held at the Herne Bay Cartoon Festival this year. Private views for two of those took place on 1 August, the day before the festival’s main live-drawing event. Photos by Kasia Kowalska and Gerard Whyman.

Photo © Gerard Whyman

Photo © Gerard Whyman

Photo © Kasia Kowalska

The Independent’s Dave Brown with his work. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

Lines in the Sand, the main festival exhibition, featured work by more than 50 artists. There were cartoons on the subjects of seaside and surrealism, as is usual at Herne Bay, plus there was a room dedicated to cartoons on the fallout from the Charlie Hebdo massacre in January. The book Draw the Line Here was on sale at the exhibition.

There was even some drawing on the walls by the cartoonists. Here's Nathan Ariss and Tim Sanders in action. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

There were lines drawn on the wall at the Lines in the Sand viewing. Here are cartoonists Nathan Ariss and Tim Sanders in action. Photos © Kasia Kowalska

There was also a viewing of the exhibition in tribute to the late Martin Honeysett at the Bay Art Gallery. That was opened by Sir Roger Gale, the Herne Bay MP.

Sir Roger Gale, the town's MP, opened the exhibition of Martin Honeysett cartoons. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

Sir Roger Gale opened the exhibition of Martin Honeysett cartoons. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

One of Honeysett's timelessly brilliant cartoons. Photo © Gerard Whyman

One of Honeysett’s timelessly brilliant cartoons. Photo © Gerard Whyman

Sir Roger Gale with Steve Coombes, one of the festival organisers, and Penny Precious, Martin Honeysett's widow, who curated the exhibition. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

Sir Roger Gale with Steve Coombes, one of the festival organisers, and Penny Precious, Martin Honeysett’s widow, who curated the exhibition. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

On the previous evening there was a viewing of Outrage! A brief history of offensive cartoons, the third festival exhibition, held at the Seaside Museum. It featured work from the British Cartoon Archive in Canterbury. But there was also a never-before-seen Ralph Steadman, his response to the Charlie Hebdo massacre.

Steve Coombes at the Outrage! exhibition with Ralph Steadman's cartoon. Photo © Steve Coombes

Steve Coombes at the Outrage! exhibition with Ralph Steadman’s cartoon. Photo © Steve Coombes

As if all this wasn’t enough, for the first time this year the festival has a fringe exhibition! The One New Street gallery showed a small exhibition called Not Just Cartoons, featuring Glenn Marshall, Ingram Pinn and others.

Promotional mug at the One New Street Gallery, featuring Glenn Marshall. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

Promotional mug at the One New Street Gallery, featuring Glenn Marshall. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

Herne Bay Cartoon Festival

August 3, 2015 in General

 

THE THIRD HERNE Bay Cartoon Festival took place last weekend with cartoonists and caricaturists arriving from all over the country. Three exceedingly inspirational exhibitions were permanent satellites in nearby locations around the central main event on Sunday in the Bandstand on the seafront.

A mind-bogglingly brilliant collection of cartoons by the late Martin Honeysett was accompanied by Outrage: A brief history of offensive cartoons, which contained an impressive array of prints and originals by artists from Gillray to Ralph Steadman.

The main cartoon festival exhibition, Lines In The Sand, was impressively contributed to by a large number of Professional Cartoonists’ Organisation members, and others, and this was complemented by another display of cartoons from the PCO/English Pen book Draw The Line Here, sales of which received a boost from visitors to the exhibitions and the festival.

The public event in the Bandstand consisted of large boards being covered in Herne Bay-inspired graphic jollity by both PCO and non-PCO members alike. The cartoonists in attendance were: Nathan Ariss, Jeremy Banx, Dave Brown, Matt “Hack” Buck, Des Buckley, Simon Ellinas, Tim Harries, Alex Hughes, The Surreal McCoy, Royston Robertson, Tim Ruscoe, Tim Sanders, Cathy Simpson, Bill Stott, Glenn Marshall, Rob Murray, Steve Way and Gerard Whyman. Andrew Birch was also in Herne Bay but alas was taken ill and unable to attend on the Sunday. He assures us he is much improved and we wish him well.

The festival organisers, Steve Coombes and Sue Austen, did a good job of ensuring that all cartoonists were warmly welcomed and included in the activities, as well as treating them generously with hospitality and accommodation.

The seaside location and time of the year really contributes to this event and from the positive comments received from the public, it is doing a great deal for PR and awareness of the art of cartooning.

Martin Honeysett exhibition. Note: this has now been extended until 9 August

BUY Draw The Line Here

 

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by Royston

Honeysett in Herne Bay

July 28, 2015 in Events, General, News

Honeysett exhibition poster

An exhibition of cartoons by Martin Honeysett, who died in January, is now on in Herne Bay, as part of the cartoon festival. See poster above for details.

The work on show covers editorial and gag cartooning and illustration. It includes cartoons for Private Eye, Punch, New Statesman, The Oldie, Radio Times, Sunday Telegraph and the Observer.

The illustrative work includes collaborations with Sue Townsend, Michael Palin, Terry Jones and Ivor Cutler. There are also drawings produced while Martin was a visiting professor at Kyoto Seika University and depictions of local scenes in Hastings, where he lived.

The cartoon in the poster above, which lampoons the town’s somewhat gappy pier, was drawn by Martin on a big board at the festival last year. Here he is at the all-important pencilling stage.

Martin Honeysett begins his big board cartoon at Herne Bay 2014

Martin Honeysett begins his big board cartoon at Herne Bay 2014

Cartoonists will be gathering in Herne Bay once again this weekend, and are sure to raise a glass to their departed and much-missed colleague.

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by Royston

Outrage! First Herne Bay Cartoon Festival exhibition opens

July 20, 2015 in Events, General, News

Outrage! A brief history of offensive cartoons -- poster

The exhibition Outrage! A brief history of offensive cartoons is now on at the Seaside Museum in Herne Bay, Kent, the first event in the third Herne Bay Cartoon Festival.

It includes works from the British Cartoon Archive in Canterbury and features David Low, the infamous Oz schoolkids’ edition, a cartoon Private Eye didn’t dare publish and a one that provoked a diplomatic incident. There is also a never-before-seen Ralph Steadman, his response to the Charlie Hebdo massacre, which is also a demonstration of the right to offend.

The museum is at 12 William Street, Herne Bay, open Tues-Sun, 10am-4pm. The show runs until 16 August.

The main festival exhibition, Lines in the Sand, will be held at Beach Creative from 28 July to 9 August. The gallery is in Beach Street and is open Tues-Sat 10am-4pm and Sun 11am-3pm.

There will also be an exhibition of cartoons by the late Martin Honeysett, who exhibited and appeared at the first two Herne Bay events. That will be at the Bay Art Gallery, William Street, from 28 July. The gallery is open Tues-Sun 10am-4pm.

The main day of live drawing at the Bandstand, featuring big boards, workshops, caricatures, and more, is Sunday 2 August, from 12pm-5pm. There will also be comic strip and cartoon workshops at Beach Creative on Saturday 1 August and at the Bandstand on the Sunday.

Jeremy Banx's poster for the Herne Bay Cartoon Festival, as seen in Private Eye

Jeremy Banx’s poster for the Herne Bay Cartoon Festival, as seen in Private Eye

The Herne Bay Cartoon Festival is sponsored by the Professional Cartoonists’ Organisation and and supported using public funding by Arts Council England.

We’ll have more nearer the time. You can see lots more coverage of the previous two events, including videos by David Good, in our Herne Bay archive.